Collaborate in the Community

Visiting Artis Program
Visiting Artist Program

Baltimore Clayworks is passionately committed to and nationally recognized for providing access to hands-on art making activities year round to economically and socially marginalized citizens in the greater Baltimore community. We accomplish this goal by collaborating with organizations and community institutions who understand that their own values and objectives can be advanced by including arts participation in their programs. By hosting visiting artists, the Community Arts program at Clayworks is able to further this goal through intensive residencies which engage a community in an empowering art making experience. Grants from organizations such as the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation and Artvantage fund such projects and encourage the fulfillment of Community Arts’ goals in the community.

Through collaborations among Baltimore Clayworks, visiting artists, and local communities

  • Underserved communities in Baltimore receive authentic hands on art making experiences.
  • Visiting artists advance their careers by taking on leadership roles and playing a major creative roll in the project
  • The studio environment at Baltimore Clayworks is enhanced with a fresh perspective and exchange of ideas
  • Communities benefit from working with a master artist who is committed to collaboration and nurturing creativity
  • Public art becomes a permanent mark of the residency, the community, Baltimore Clayworks, and the collaboration between the three

Zach Tate, 2014
Zach is a figurative artist out of Goshen, Indiana. He will work with our senior adults in community in January 2014. Generously funded by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and MetLife’s Creative Aging program

Patty Bilbro, 2013
Patty is a resident artist at Baltimore Clayworks and a functional potter and illustrator. She created functional narrative platters with our senior adults in community. Generously funded by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and MetLife’s Creative Aging program

Brett Freund, 2013
Brett is a handbuilder who is inspired by geometric crystal shapes to create functional ceramics. He was the 2011-2012 Lormina Salter fellowship Artist at Baltimore Clayworks. He created crystal sculptures with our senior adult women in community. Generously funded by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and MetLife’s Creative Aging program

Eva Zethraeus, 2013
Eva is a Swedish sculpture who is inspired by organic shapes found in nature to create table, floor and wall sculptures using porcelain. She worked with our senior adults in community to create textured wall boxes. Generously funded by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and MetLife’s Creative Aging program.

Aisha Harrison, 2011
Aisha is a native of Olympia, WA. Aisha’s figurative work explores the intricacies of human emotion that arise from owning a biracial identity in contemporary American society.
Aisha worked with our senior adults at both Jubilee Arts and Zeta center to create figurative busts using high fire clay. Generously funded by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and MetLife’s Creative Aging program.

Mary Cloonan, 2011
Mary Cloonan is a resident artist and Exhibitions’s Director at Baltimore Clay works. She created narrative book sculptures with our senior adults using low-fire clay and unusual surface materials for decoration.  Generously funded by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and MetLife’s Creative Aging program.

Keith Wallace Smith, 2011
Keith Wallace Smith is assistant professor at Kennesaw State University in metropolitan Atlanta. He is a figurative sculptor working primarily in ceramics and cast metal with a long-standing commitment to making and teaching art.

In April 2011, Keith worked with teen and adult participants from our satellite studio at Jubilee Arts and the Mt. Washington Studio creating plaster molds of faces and hands in support of a dialogue surrounding identity in Baltimore City.

Kyle and Kelly Phelps, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011
2006
Kyle and Kelly Phelps did workshops at both Mt. Washington and the Mondawmin Satellite Studios. The workshop at Mondawmin for senior adults included a talk and project in which each participant created 3 profiles of a face that were attached together. The Phelps’ will be visiting Clayworks again in 2008 through the ARTvantage program of the Maryland State Arts Council, and their workshops will focus on understanding our own cultural histories through our families, drawing from experiences to create art that celebrates who we are.

2008
Kyle and Kelly led four different workshops for senior adults, youth, teens and teachers. The Phelps’s taught twenty-four senior adults during which time they created the project titled “My Grandmothers Hands.” Each participant created lifelike replicas of their own hands using the bondo technique. The senior women created a second project, for which they had to tell a narrative of their lives using clay as the tool of expression. These figural/sculptural projects were created through the process of building in high relief. The Phelps also led 28 young people (teens and children ages 6-16) in hands-on ceramic arts instruction. Using their bondo technique, the group of students made two collaborative projects by pressing their hands into a large slab of clay and adding decorative elements. At the end of the workshops, all the work was displayed in Clayworks Community Arts Gallery.

2011
The Phelps create mixed media sculptures surrounding themes surrounding blue collar lifestyles and issues. The brothers presented their work and history at Baltimore’s Steelworker’ Hall in early spring 2011 to a room full of community folks, factory workers and their families. This presentation inspired an open dialogue surrounding blue collar issues. Blue Collar was funded by the Maryland Humanities Council and was a part of Baltimore Clayworks cumulating 30th anniversary exhibition, Transcending Integration.

Kyle and Kelly return again in 2011 to work with residents of the Tuerk House, the oldest recovery facility in the state of Maryland. In June, 2011, the Phelps will create collaborative sculpture with clay participants from the 3.3 Men’s Recovery program. Funded by MSAC’s ARTvantage program.